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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Brooklyn, New York
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    1,881

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    Quote Originally Posted by arise257 View Post
    I'd argue that crate digging for samples is NOT an artform. Unless you're a DJ who's mixing a certain genre, era, or atmosphere, crate digging is just a means to an end. I think that crate digging was a necessity of the early days of hip-hop because it was the easiest, most cost-effective way of introducing new sounds to one's music. It was also because MCs used to rhyme over music spun live that crate digging got so tied to hip-hop.

    I kind of see crate digging as an old-fashioned way of getting building your knowledge and library of music and sounds. I'm not trying to diminish its usefulness, but technology has vastly widened the age-old search for sample-worthy music.
    Wow... There are a couple of things I strongly disagree with here.

    (1) Calling crate digging merely a "necessity of the early days of hip-hop because it was the easiest, most cost-effective way of introducing new sounds to one's music," is really, really off-base, misinformed and just plane inaccurate! Hip hop/rap was the first music to be entirely predicated upon previously recorded sound. This wasn't an accident, this was a conscious decision by hip hop/rap practitioners. And the PREFERRED, MOST IMPORTANT sound came from records!!! This wasn't a cost-effective "necessity", this was the life-force of the entire medium.

    (2) Buying a keyboard would have been much more "cost-effective" than buying records on a routine basis. In fact, beat diggin' is/was a rather expensive proposition. In fact, during the so-called "early days" (funny), there weren't NO second hand vinyl record stores: records were not yet displaced by CDs as the #1 recorded music media source. And thus, all records were full retail price.

    (3) Crate digging is considered an art form because it's part of the artistic process for those beatmakers/producers who make sample-based beats, through the use of vinyl records.

    (4) There's nothing "old fashion" about building your knowledge. Technology serves at the command of the one who uses it. That is, technology is to be used in the manner that each individual figures it to be best for them. An over-reliance on "technology" for technology's sake can have a rather negative effect on creativity. The goal of technology is not simply to "replace" something, the goal of technology is to facilitate and make easier the fundamental things that we have always done. Shooting a full length feature film with digital cameras is very cost-effective, yet nearly ALL feature length films are STILL shot with film. Film is NOT considered an "old fashion" way of doing things. It is an artistic choice, one I must add, that still has tremendous value to filmmakers on both sides of the budget extremes.

    (5) It's not that technology has "widened the age-old search for sample-worthy music." For one thing, you seem to be slanted towards considering searching for vinyl records as being "old"... Yet, the facts do NOT support this. Consider this fact: more than 1,000,000 vinyl records containing jazz, rhythm and blues, soul, funk, and reggae were cut between 1969 and 1975. Most hard core vinyl record collectors own just about 1,000-5,000 records. That's not even 5% of the possibilities.... So while technology may help one find rare records, technology can not displace this particular search method. Why? Because search technology is predicated upon the data that it has ACCESS to... And that, my man, is one of the things that makes hip hop/rap very unique: it has always cherished and has always been based on the principle of unique access... And being unique, well, that should not ever be considered old fashion.

    -Sa'id

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    225

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    Didn't have time to reply to this so I'll let Shadow explain:-

  3. #13

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    dj shadow is the truth

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by angel12 View Post
    dj shadow is the truth
    Excuse my ignorance but who is he?And what is his significance in reference to hip-hop?

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donproductionsbeatz View Post
    Excuse my ignorance but who is he?And what is his significance in reference to hip-hop?
    one of the best producers ever

    fun facts:

    He is considered a prominent figure in the development of instrumental hip hop and first gained notice with the release of his highly acclaimed debut album Endtroducing....., which was constructed entirely from samples.

    Endtroducing would make the Guinness World Records book for "First Completely Sampled Album" in 2001.

    In November 2006 Time magazine named it one of its ALL-TIME 100 albums.

    DJ Shadow is often cited as a leading creator of U.S. trip hop.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by angel12 View Post
    one of the best producers ever

    fun facts:

    He is considered a prominent figure in the development of instrumental hip hop and first gained notice with the release of his highly acclaimed debut album Endtroducing....., which was constructed entirely from samples.

    Endtroducing would make the Guinness World Records book for "First Completely Sampled Album" in 2001.

    In November 2006 Time magazine named it one of its ALL-TIME 100 albums.

    DJ Shadow is often cited as a leading creator of U.S. trip hop.
    I must be living in a cage cuz this is the 1st time i am hearing about him

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    119

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    Quote Originally Posted by G-man View Post
    Didn't have time to reply to this so I'll let Shadow explain:-
    Very interesting video I never heard of DJ Shadow before, that is crazy collection of records he had to have at least 2,000+. Gotta see the film Scratch what is it about? Also what is the song playing in the background plus the drum break sounds familiar to me? Watching these lil snippets really motivates me even more to get better at production. AWESOME DOPE ISH
    Last edited by AlonzoNelson84; 04-09-2012 at 11:30 AM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    31

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlonzoNelson84 View Post
    Very interesting video I never heard of DJ Shadow before, that is crazy collection of records he had to have at least 2,000+. Gotta see the film Scratch what is it about? Also what is the song playing in the background plus the drum break sounds familiar to me? Watching these lil snippets really motivates me even more to get better at production. AWESOME DOPE ISH
    The movie Scratch is mostly about DJing but does have some stuff dealing with beat making/sampling and of course a ton based around vinyl. Good watch. I'd also recommend Copyright Criminals if you're getting into sampling.

    That DOPE song in the snippet? "Midnight In A Perfect World" off of DJ Shadow's Endtroducing. If you're really looking to get into sampled hip hop, that record is a must have.

    And to the original question here, I guess I'll my two cents. I've done my fair share of both online and vinyl digging. Back in Cincinnati there were a few decent record stores that I could dig out. When I lived in Athens, Ohio, there really wasn't anywhere to dig. So a lot of my online digging went on during that period. I now live in Chicago...soooo there's vinyl everywhere. I don't dig online at all anymore.

    While digging online is convenient, often free, and quick, I find digging for vinyl to be almost therapeutic. I also feel like I'm making a greater connection with the music I'm sampling and as a result with the music I'm creating. Making a greater connection means making better beats to me. Oh, and I love that snap crackle and pop!

    Peace.
    ...still need time for beats and rhymes...

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    High Wycombe, UK
    Posts
    18

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    I dig online out of necessity, perhaps a bit out of laziness too. It's a lot easier with limited equipment to manipulate an MP3 to use with software.

    I do agree that vinyl sounds beter generally but as Sa'id said for a lot of beatmakers, MP3s are the only real option. For instance, I own a hundred or so vinyls but at present I don't have a deck!

    Also, whilst I would love nothing more than to be able to root around in a dusty room full of vinyl looking for beats and sampleable material, the reality is that it's a lot easier to sit on youtube searching. It's partially laziness but also a matter of practicality really as there aren't a lot of record shops where I live and the internet is pretty much infinite in terms of the music you can find!

  10. #20

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    Yo,

    I'm for vynil all the way!
    Don't forget that the sound quality it's so much better than what you found on the net! The sound of vynil it's richer than any CD or compressed audio file you can find!

    If you diggin with a true love for music you can enjoy the heat of a vynil playing... It's was a major error from the music industry to pass to other media form... I thing it's have a role in the decrease of music sale... Give a gift to your ear, listen vynil!!!!

    Plus, digging force me to go out - away from my computer and akai!!!

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